Weekly output: HBO and cord cutting, wireless carriers, two-step verification

This week involved many meetings, but that was okay–I spent a couple of days in New York catching up with my Yahoo Tech colleagues, getting updates about how we’ve done and hearing about future plans. I also successfully installed OS X Yosemite on both of my Macs and cheered on a friend running the Marine Corps Marathon for the first time. Overall: not a bad seven days.

Yahoo Tech post on HBO10/21/2014: Will Sports Learn from HBO’s Grand Online Experiment?, Yahoo Tech

This is a column I’d wanted to write for the past few years, but until recently I didn’t think my chance would come until maybe 2016. The photo illustrating my musings on HBO’s move to sell online-only viewing was an idea that came to me at the last minute, as I was flipping through the paper at the dining table; if only the words could pop into my head so quickly!

10/21/2014: This Is the Best Wireless Carrier for You, Time

The condensed edition of my Wirecutter guide to wireless carriers has run at a few other places (for instance, Fast Company posted its version Sept. 21), but I was tickled more than usual to see it land on the site of the newsmagazine I read almost every week in high school.

10/26/2014: Security update: AOL learns to two-step, and why your ISP may not, USA Today

A friend sent an apologetic e-mail about his AOL account getting hacked (yes, I have some pals who continue to use the site); I was going to tell him to turn on two-step verification and then realized I couldn’t; inquiries with AOL PR led to me breaking the (not-quite-huge) news that it will soon offer two-step verification once again.

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Weekly output: iCloud hack (x4), LG G Watch R, Intel Core M, IFA, TiVo apps

After a week in Berlin to cover the IFA trade show, I’m home, but not for long enough–late tomorrow morning, I start making my way to Vegas for the U.S. wireless industry’s own gathering. Ugh.

9/1/2014: How safe are your photos in the cloud?, Fox 5 DC

I did the first of a round of interviews about Apple’s iCloud hacking problem for the local Fox station. And now you know what my home office looks like.

9/2/2014: Security in the cloud, WTOP

I did this interview via Skype minutes after checking into my IFA hotel and getting set up on its WiFi.

9/2/2014: Rob Pegoraro On Apple Data Theft, Alice’s Coffee House With Johnny Molson

And this interview followed maybe 15 minutes after WTOP’s.

9/3/2014: Be Angry About the iCloud Hack, but Not Surprised, Yahoo Tech

I did not plan to spend most of my first afternoon in Berlin cooped up in my room writing a column, but that’s exactly what I did. One other issue with Apple’s account security that I should have addressed: the weird requirement that you wait three days before two-step verification kicks in on your account.

9/4/2014: LG’s G Watch R May Bring Smartwatches to Acceptable Dorkiness Levels, Yahoo Tech

After the quick hands-on inspection that led to this post, I’m cautiously optimistic about what LG can do with this second-generation Android Wear watch. But let’s see some battery testing first.

9/5/2014: Farewell to Noisy Computers? Intel’s Latest Chip May Make Your Laptop Way Quieter, Yahoo Tech

This is the first time I’ve written about an Intel processor launch in a long while–which may only be a consequence of which writing clients I’ve had at given times.

IFA 2014 slideshow9/5/2014: 10 Brand New Gadgets Not Coming to America, Yahoo Tech

I’m still waiting to get some sort of “why do you hate America?” feedback about this post.

9/7/2014:  Why TiVo’s app can’t play TV on TV, USA Today

I briefly mentioned this weird TiVo issue last summer and then, um, kind of forgot until somebody else asked about the same problem a few weeks ago. third-patico (9/15/14: That mysterious two-word phrase was most likely my attempt to write “third-party” in a jet-lagged haze. But I have no idea what third-party app or service I had in mind at the time.)

Weekly output: CableCard, two-step verification

It’s now been a month and a half since my last air travel for work. Crazy, huh? I hope the airline industry can deal with my absence.

Yahoo Tech CableCard post4/22/2014: Dept. of Diminishing Choice: Cable Industry Wants Out of the CableCARD It Invented, Yahoo Tech

I returned to a topic I last covered in an August post for Ars Technica about the emergence of a bill that would weaken the regulatory framework behind the CableCard that TiVo and a few other manufacturers rely on to make cable-compatible hardware.

Notice that I don’t write “Card” in all-caps here: Those four letters aren’t an acronym, so capitalizing them all just plays into some marketer’s idea of text hacking.

4/27/2014: Two-step verification: It’s a trust issue, USA Today

This column began on Tuesday, when a local tech-policy type asked why Google’s two-step verification kept inviting him to mark a computer as trusted and therefore exempt from this security check. I decided that query was too narrow–but that there could be a column looking at the broader topic of how strictly different sites implement this concept.

Weekly output: online banking

A week split in half by a national holiday means I don’t have much to show for my work this time around. Don’t expect much over the coming week either–although I will be working on stories you’ll see later.

USAT online-banking column12/29/2013: Tip: How to bank safely online at home, USA Today

A reader asked one of those questions that seemed simple but unfolded to reveal enough other wrinkles to make for an interesting column to write. This post also gave me a chance to scold the big banks for not embracing two-step verification.

On Sulia, I shared details about two episodes of holiday tech support (one involving Time Machine’s inexplicable failure to clear old backups, another an aging AirPort’s apparent breakdown), pointed readers to a wonderful NASA recreation of Apollo 8’s unlikely “Earthrise” photo, panned Dave Eggers’ dystopian novel “The Circle” as “Atlas Shrugged” 2.0, and wrote up my first impressions of my in-laws’ Fiat 500e electric car.

Weekly output: Game of Thrones, security, augmented reality, T-Mobile, phone insurance

Happy Easter!

DisCo Game of Thrones post

3/27/2013: Ethicists Make Lousy Economists, And Other Lessons From the Endless “Game of Thrones” Debate, Disruptive Competition Project

This started life as a draft here a year ago, when I’d gotten fed up by seeing the same old arguments thrown around on Twitter and in blog posts about the HBO series. Then I set it aside, which turned out be a good thing when I had a paying client interested in the topic.

3/29/2013: Social-Media Trend To Watch: Security That Doesn’t Have To Suck, Disruptive Competition Project

With Dropbox, Apple and, soon, Evernote and Twitter following Google’s lead in offering two-step verification as a login option, I’m cautiously optimistic that this competition will yield more usable security than what the efforts of corporate IT have yielded so far. The skeptical comments this post has since gotten have me wondering if I was too optimistic.

3/29/2013: Augmented Reality Doesn’t Need Google Glasses, Discovery News

I revisited a topic I last covered in depth in a 2009 column for the Post. Part of this post recaps how I still use some of the apps I mentioned back then, part suggests some other possible applications, and then I note how Windows Phone 8’s “Lenses” feature could foster “AR” on that platform. I’m not sure all of those parts hold together.

3/31/2013: Q&A: Is T-Mobile’s new math a good deal?, USA Today

The wireless carrier’s no-contract plans may not save you much money if you buy a new smartphone exactly every two years, but if you upgrade less often–or buy an unlocked phone from a third party–they can work well for you. (And if they foster the growth of a carrier-independent market for phones, they would work well for the rest of us.) The post also includes a reminder to watch out for phone-insurance charges on your bill.

Sulia highlights: calculating how much you’d spend on an iPhone 5 and two years of service at the four major wireless carriers; noting the belated arrival of threaded comments on Facebook pages; explaining why Google Maps doesn’t offer real-time arrival estimates for Metro and other transit systems; critiquing the woeful setup experience on a Linksys router.