Weekly output: defective touchscreen digitizers, the future of video content, Google Books, Tech Night Owl, Verizon Wireless privacy

I had one of my shortest stays in San Francisco this week–I arrived Sunday night, then flew home Wednesday morning. Three days in, jet lag still had me waking up so early that getting to SFO for a 7:25 a.m. departure was no trouble at all.

10/19/2015: Phone with mind of its own may not be hacked or haunted, USA Today

My Sunday column went up a day late. After all the deadlines I’ve shredded, I can’t complain.

Comptel Plus panel10/20/2015: Looking Ahead: The Future of Content, Comptel Plus

I moderated this panel about online video services in San Francisco at the annual conference of the Washington trade group that just renamed itself from Comptel to Incompas. My fellow panelists: Netflix public-policy director Corie Wright, Verizon Wireless v.p. and associate general counsel William H. Johnson, and Zander Lehmann, writer and creator of the Hulu series “Casual.” Almost all of the questions we got from the audience focused on something neither Hulu nor Netflix offer, and which is only available in limited quantities on VzW’s Go90 service: live sports.

10/20/2015: Google’s Fair Use Victory Is a Win for Us All, Yahoo Tech

It had been years since I last wrote about Google Books and the Authors Guild lawsuit against it, but Friday’s ruling in favor of Google allowed me to return to the topic–and offer some thoughts on the fuzzy definition of “fair use” in copyright law. Fun fact: the books in that photo fill a shelf in the lobby of the Marriott Courtyard Union Square, where I stayed Sunday night.

10/24/2015: October 24, 2015 — Josh Centers and Rob Pegoraro, Tech Night Owl

I talked about Apple’s new iMac and my old one, the state of software quality in Cupertino, and the prospect of an Apple car (I think Apple’s talents would be better placed in imitating Tesla by developing a competitor to the Powerwall home battery).

10/25/2015: Verizon’s AOL deal brings new privacy worries, USA Today

The impending combination of Verizon and AOL’s advertising machinery will bring one improvement in privacy: Verizon Wireless will stop stamping its “UIDH” tracker all of its subscribers’ unencrypted Web traffic. But the company’s privacy notice is sufficiently vague on this point that I missed it in a first draft.

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Weekly output: the RIAA’s changing mood about digital music, tech journalism, opting out of Verizon’s supercookie

Starting tomorrow, I’m going to have a little less time each week to get my work done, courtesy of the Nats’ 10th season in D.C. beginning with Monday’s home opener. (If I stop responding to e-mail, phone calls and social-media interactions shortly before 4:05 p.m., that won’t be a coincidence.) Welcome back, baseball.

3/31/2015: Now That It’s Growing, the Music Industry Finally Forgives the Internet, Yahoo Tech

Writing this recap of how the Recording Industry Association of America has become bullish on the digital-music market after years of pessimism and pining away for DRM and tighter copyright laws to solve business-model problems provided me with a fun stroll down memory lane.

4/3/2015: ICYMI: Meet The Washington D.C. Tech Media, BusinessWired

BusinessWire’s Simon Ogus wrote this recap of the tech-journalism panel I participated in the previous week.

USAT VzW supercookie post4/5/2015: How to turn off Verizon’s ‘supercookie’ tracking, USA Today

This was an obvious topic to cover. I borrowed my brother’s Verizon account to verify that this opt-out procedure works as advertised–and, of course, to make sure he and his wife’s phones were opted out. I did that Friday morning; as of Sunday evening, the Am I Being Tracked? site shows that the Verizon ad-tracking header is still in place on his phone’s Web traffic, which squares with Verizon PR’s statement that it takes several days for this change to go through.