Weekly output: Apple Tax on storage, CrowdStrike CEO, Facebook Pages, Rod Rosenstein on security and encryption

This year is officially in the home stretch, but some of this week’s work almost certainly won’t show up in my bank account until 2019. Remembering your clients’ varying payment schedules is essential to keeping some level of freelance accounting sanity.

11/28/2018: New MacBook Air and Mac mini show the Apple Tax on storage lives on, USA Today

As I’d pledged a few weeks ago, I returned to the subject of Apple’s belated updates to the Mac mini and MacBook Air to take a whack at these computers’ stingy entry-level storage allocations and the steep price to upgrade their solid-state drives. Note the correction on this column: I saw that Apple only offered a 256-gigabyte SSD on the entry-level iMac but stupidly neglected to check the storage options on other configurations.

11/29/2018: CrowdStrike CEO on political infosec lessons learned (Q&A), The Parallax

I talked to CrowdStrike chief executive George Kurtz at Web Summit and transcribed my interview on the flight home. Then this writeup–one not pegged to any breaking news–took a little longer to run.

11/30/2018: Facebook still hasn’t fixed this loophole for fake accounts, Yahoo Finance

This post started with some Thanksgiving tech support that revealed some highly sketchy pages in a relative’s News Feed, and then my inquiries with Facebook led the social network to nuke two pages with a combined 3.4 million Likes. Today, a reader pointed me to several other pages apparently run by the same people behind those two removed pages, so you probably haven’t read my last thoughts on this issue.

11/30/2018: Deputy AG Rosenstein calls on Big Tech to protect users, Yahoo Finance

Deputy U.S. attorney general Rod Rosenstein brought two messages to Georgetown Law’s Cybercrime 2020 symposium–and they contradicted each other to a fair amount.

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Weekly output: “responsible encryption,” Flash and Silverlight

It’s been another week with less stories to my name than usual. I’ve done more work than the number of links would suggest–over the past two weeks, I’ve filed three pieces that have not yet been posted–but it does look bad.

10/20/2017: Why the Feds want to make it easier for them to get into your phone, Yahoo Finance

I’ve written dozens of posts about the angst of law-enforcement types over the rise of encrypted devices and apps that they can’t search, so for this one I quizzed a few different sources… and came up with the same overall conclusion as before.

10/22/2017: Why Flash and Microsoft Silverlight frustrations just won’t go away, USA Today

I had what I thought would be a decent column with meaningless quotes from publicists at three sites that still ask their users to install Flash or Silverlight–but then a publicist for Major League Baseball told me that they’d move from Flash to HTML5 video for the 2018 season, a fact they had yet to announce.