Weekly output: net neutrality, Vizio surveillance, Amazon ads

Our daughter spent the first three workdays of the week home sick with a cold, which had a calamitous effect on my productivity. Especially on Monday, when my wife’s schedule left her unable to take any time off from work.

iPad screengrab of Yahoo post2/7/2017: Open-internet rules look dead. Now what?, Yahoo Finance

This look at the fate of net-neutrality regulations under new Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai benefited from an interview that was supposed to happen during CES. But I could never coordinate my schedule with that of political commentator and TYT Network founder Cenk Uygur during the show, so the publicist who had suggested a CES meeting instead arranged a sit-down when Uygur was in Arlington for a conference last weekend. Since TYT’s news and talk shows depend on Internet distribution, the possible effect on Internet video of weakened open-Internet rules was an obvious topic to discuss.

2/10/2017: FTC’s case against Vizio illuminates terrible tech industry habit, Yahoo Finance

This is a post that I would have written sooner had my workweek not been so thoroughly disrupted. When I finally had some free time, it hit me that Vizio’s deceptive presentation of the “Smart Interactivity” feature that tracked your viewing habits could fairly be called a “dark pattern” user experience–and that I could get an informed ruling on that by asking the guy who coined that term, London-based user-experience designer Harry Brignull.

2/12/2017: How to stop seeing your Amazon searches everywhere, USA Today

The Amazon ad-preferences setting that stops the retail giant’s ads from featuring your recent shopping searches on other sites has been around for a while. But to judge from the appreciative response I’m seeing on Twitter and Facebook to this column, its existence was news to many Amazon shoppers.

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Weekly output: digitizing infrastructure, Oracle v. Google, Bluetooth beacons, ads and privacy

After two straight weeks of travel (separated by almost 24 hours at home), I have the novel experience of looking at my calendar and not seeing any upcoming flights. That can only be explained by a bug in that app, right?

Connected Conference panel5/27/2016: Digitizing Infrastructure, Connected Conference

The scheduling for my part of this Internet-of-Things conference in Paris moved around a lot. My original connected-cars panel got swapped out for this one, and then the speakers for a discussion of smart buildings and smart cities got reshuffled more than once. As you can see, the conference site’s page about the panel still only lists some of the people who showed up Friday morning (besides me, Olivier Selles of Bouygues Immobilier, Herbert Beck of Nexity, Riad Ziour of Openergy, Jackson Bond of Relayr and IBM’s Christian Comtat). Most surprising anecdote: How an IoT climate-control system brought a little labor peace to an office where union officials didn’t trust management’s estimates of indoor air quality.

5/27/2016: Why you should care that Google dodged Oracle’s $9 billion bullet, Yahoo Finance

This jury verdict in Google’s favor and against Oracle dropped Thursday night in Paris, so I had to write this explainer during what little downtime I had Friday morning and afternoon in the city. (Did comparing APIs to the bumps on a Lego block work for you?) I promise I will look over all 120-and-counting comments sometime soon, but hopefully not tomorrow.

5/29/2016: Don’t be alarmed if Android wants to get physical, USA Today

After a visit to one Connected Conference exhibit yielded an Android notification of a Web address being broadcast by a nearby Bluetooth beacon, I realized I had a decent column topic sitting in front of me. Writing it also gave me a chance to revisit some of the early hype around Apple’s iOS-only iBeacon.

5/29/2016: A ‘right not to be surprised’ in ads would be great — good luck defining that, Yahoo Finance

I’d had this idea kicking around since hearing AdRoll CEO Adam Berke’s talk at the Collision conference, but I somehow waited to finish writing it until I was in one of the world’s most beautiful cities.

Weekly output: “TV Everywhere,” changing journalism, ad retargeting

All of the PR pitches for Mobile World Congress exhibits and events should have tipped me off, but it only really hit me this weekend that in two weeks, I’ll be in Barcelona for that show. Which, considering the number of things I’d like to have finished before then, is not entirely convenient.

Yahoo TV Everywhere post2/4/2014: ‘TV Everywhere’ Takes a Trip to Sochi, but Some Viewers Can’t Tag Along, Yahoo Tech

The launch of NBC’s expanded online coverage of the Winter Olympics gave me an opportunity to critique its practice of limiting Internet viewership to people who can authenticate their status as paying TV subscribers. What I didn’t realize at the time I wrote this: That NBC affiliate WRC’s over-the-air signal, once one of the strongest DTV broadcasts in the D.C. area, would be pretty much unwatchable this weekend. I’d like to know what changed there.

2/4/2014: media panel, PR Newswire

With Amy Webb and Edwin Warfield, I talked about the changing nature of journalism and whether I care for some current PR and social-media practices at a Baltimore conference for PR Newswire staffers. (I’m sure our discussion had a less generic title, but I forgot to write it down, and PR Newswire’s blog hasn’t posted the promised recap yet PR Newswire’s blog post, added Feb. 24th, doesn’t cite one either.)

2/9/2014: How does ad ‘retargeting’ work?, USA Today

I’d been thinking of doing an explainer about this increasingly common advertising strategy–where one site shows an ad for something you were viewing on another site minutes earlier–and then a friend’s Facebook comment gave me an excuse to write it.

On Sulia, I offered my first impressions of Facebook’s Paper app, kvetched about a security-certificate bug in OS X that seems to have gone three years without a fix, wondered why it takes so long to answer a call in Google+’s Hangouts app, wrote an insta-review of the Feedly-compatible ReadKit RSS app for OS X, and endorsed a site called CarFreeNearMe.com that plots out real-time info about nearby rail, bus, bikeshare and car-share options.