Weekly output: net neutrality (x2), Nexus 6, connected-car privacy, Nexus lineup, Comcast fees

If only I could look this productive every week… note that all this happened with two travel days and a conference eating up my schedule, and that I filed another piece on Friday that hasn’t run yet.

11/11/2014: 5 Things to Know About Obama’s Net-Neutrality Push, Yahoo Tech

I enjoyed taking the close-up photo of an Ethernet cable that illustrates this post, and then I was pleasantly relieved not to see the comments immediately overrun with denunciations of net neutrality based on it being something President Obama supports.

11/11/2014: Beyond Email: 3 Innovative Communication Tools for Your Team, CyberCoders

My friend Andrea Smith quoted me a few times in this piece about collaborative apps used by geographically distributed workers to coordinate their work; appropriately enough, HipChat is one tab away from her story in my browser as I type this.

11/12/2014: Net neutrality, The Bill Press Show

An 8:30 am. East Coast radio interview was no problem the day after I flew to San Francisco, since jet lag had me awake around 4:30 a.m. local time. (Time-zone disruption was a bigger problem than usual on this trip; even Saturday morning, when I was thoroughly worn down from the week, I still found myself awake before 7 a.m. Ugh.)

11/12/2014: Nexus 6 review: Stop the screen-specs madness, VentureBeat

This phone bothered me more than I thought it would. Both the enormous screen and its beyond-human-vision pixel density strike me as the tech industry at its worst, chasing specs with inadequate attention to their real-world benefits.

11/12/2014: Privacy on the Road: A Conversation about Connected Cars, Privacy Identity Innovation

My interview with Catherine McCullough, executive director of the Intelligent Car Coalition, was scheduled for one of the trickier timeslots at a conference: immediately before the reception. I think we did okay; when they post video of this, you can judge for yourself 12/14/2014: see for yourself.

Boing Boing Nexus 2014 review11/13/2014: The new Nexus lineup is weak, Boing Boing

I enjoyed getting a chance to review the same devices for a different site and a different audience. Check out the comments for some detailed back-and-forth about this year’s crop of Nexus devices.

11/16/2014: Comcast changes tune on ‘change of service’ fee, USA Today

I was scrounging around for a suitable column topic when a reader’s tweet about getting hit with a fee by Comcast for the privilege of canceling his service solved that problem for me. I hope, in turn, that my spotlighting this issue helps solve my reader’s problem.

Updated 11:57 p.m. to include Andrea Smith’s piece about collaboration tools. I knew I was leaving something out the first time around…

Weekly output: Nexus Player, Nexus 9, Verizon Wireless and AT&T’s user tracking, exposed images, Facebook and Flash video

It’s been 11 whole days since I last ventured beyond the Beltway, but Tuesday morning I get back on a plane: I’m headed to the Bay Area for the Privacy Identity Innovation conference, where I’ll be conducting an onstage interview about connected cars.

11/3/2014: Google’s Nexus Player is no Apple TV; it’s not even a Chromecast, VentureBeat

Where exactly is Google going with this streaming-media player that costs almost three times a Chromecast but doesn’t do all that much more? I’m confused. (To the commenters saying “Apple fanboy”: I gladly paid my own money for a Chromecast but have never done so for an Apple TV. Also, try to show some originality in your insults.)

VentureBeat Nexus 9 review11/3/2014: Nexus 9 tablet shows Google is thinking bigger — but not big enough (review), VentureBeat

I was more conflicted about this device. If it had shipped with more memory, sold for a lower price or not retreated on the feature set of last year’s Nexus 7, I probably would have been kinder to it in this review.

11/4/2014: How Verizon Wireless Is Tracking You All Around the Web, Yahoo Tech

It’s amazing to me that VzW executives seriously think they can tamper with their subscribers’ online activity to insert a personally-identifiable tracking header and not let anybody opt out. In what universe does that not lead to a class-action lawsuit, an FTC investigation, a hostile Congressional hearing or all of the above?

11/6/2014: Jennifer Lawrence’s Hacked Photos: A “Sex Crime?” The Legal Underpinnings of Digitally Exposed Private Images and What Congress Needs to Know, Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee

I discussed the hacking of many celebrities’ iCloud photo backups, plus the broader problem of “revenge porn,” with University of Miami law professor Mary Anne Franks, the Center for Democracy and Technology’s Emma Llansó, recently-retired law prof David Post and Politico cybersecurity reporter Tal Kopan. You can watch the proceedings on C-SPAN.

11/9/2014: Facebook won’t unfriend Flash, but it should, USA Today

Months after I uninstalled Adobe Flash from this Mac’s copy of Safari, the only time I really notice its absence as a problem is when I click on a video some friend has posted to Facebook and can’t watch it. This column sheds some light on this needless compatibility problem and offers a tip about watching Amazon instant video without Microsoft’s even-less-useful Silverlight plug-in.