Weekly output: net neutrality, teens on Facebook, Chrome and passwords

I had two stories this week show up online without the links I’d added. Since two different sites and CMSes were involved, I’m left with the conclusion that I’m personally snakebit. Or that I maxed out a monthly link quota that I didn’t know existed.

Yahoo Tech net-neutrality post1/14/2014: Why Is Tuesday’s Court Decision on Net Neutrality Such a Big Deal? And What Happens Next?, Yahoo Tech

This was not the column I’d originally written for this week, but when a federal court handed down a ruling Tuesday morning that gutted the Federal Communications Commission’s authority to enforce net-neutrality regulations, I had to drop everything and write an analysis of a result that I saw coming back in 2010. This post initially appeared without any of the links I’d added, for reasons nobody has been able to figure out; we fixed that earlier today.

1/16/2014: Rob Pegoraro, columnist for USA Today and Yahoo Tech, talks about teens dumping Facebook, WTOP

WTOP had me via Skype to talk about an iStrategyLabs report, based on usage data Facebook provides to advertisers, of declining teen Facebook use. About 10 minutes afterwards, I remembered that only two months ago, I’d heard about some enlightening research into teen social-media use that would have been useful to cite on the air.

1/19/2014: Why does Chrome ask for your Mac Keychain password?, USA Today

For the second time in three weeks, my USAT column dealt with a problem I’d experienced on my own computer–in this case, annoying Keychain prompts by the Mac version of Chrome. The column somehow got posted without any links; I’ll ask management about that.

On Sulia, I observed that Netflix’s data on average streaming rates across different ISPs showed how much viewing there involves lower resolutions, heaped scorn on the Weather Channel’s attempt to guilt DirecTV into paying a higher carriage fee, confessed to having a Digital Compact Cassette in my office, shared a fix for Evernote’s iPad app not digitizing scanned business cards, and complained about Netflix becoming unwatchably slow over my 15-Mbps Verizon Fios connection.

 

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Weekly output: podcast, DVD recording, TPS panel, Social Machines, Twitter and Topsy, searching within sites

The amount of writing inventoried below is a tiny fraction of all the tweeting I did from the Tech Policy Summit last week. I’m surprised my follower total didn’t plunge after all of that verbiage.

6/5/2012: Rob’s May Podcast: Big-Screen Banter With Dave Zatz, CEA Digital Dialogue

For the latest episode of the CEA podcast, I had a long chat with longtime D.C.-area tech blogger Dave Zatz. He’s been doing great work covering the video end of the electronics industry, I’ve cited his posts many times (most recently, in my Discovery News post about Vudu’s disc-to-digital service), and he has the unusual perspective of having seen gadget marketing from the inside out in two jobs with electronics vendors.

6/6/2012: How DVD Recording Got Paused, CEA Digital Dialogue

My past enthusiasm for DVD recording doesn’t look as ill-founded as my cheerleading for municipal WiFi, but it’s not far behind. In this post, I explain four angles that I missed–and make the shocking confession that I bought a 3D-compatible Blu-ray player in December. Worse yet, this thing can also play SACDs.

6/6/2012: Looking Ahead: Intellectual Property and Innovation, Tech Policy Summit

Video of the contentious discussion I moderated at this conference in Napa, Calif., featuring Techdirt’s Mike Masnick and USC Annenberg Innovation Lab director Jonathan Taplin.

6/7/2012: ‘Social Machines’: Check In For Free Beer, Discovery News

An overdue dose of DC-area tech news in my coverage, featuring clever hacks put together by the Dupont Circle social-media marketing firm iStrategyLabs that carry on a tradition of connecting ordinary devices to the Internet that I first wrote about in the Post’s long-forgotten “CyberSurfing” column. (Anybody remember the Cygnus Support Christmas tree?) Speaking of hacking, note how this post includes gratuitous and yet relevant, justifiable references to free beer and Lady Gaga.

6/10/2012: Topsy knows what you did on Twitter last year, USA Today

A friend’s Facebook query about looking up tweets from NASA’s STS-135 launch Tweetup last July led to this–which was once set to run as the shorter tip item in the column until I realized I could address other recent developments in the Twitterverse. It also offers a tip about working around a site’s defective internal search that I hope isn’t too mind-numbingly obvious.

In other news, a story I covered two weeks ago–the arrival of the iPhone on Cricket Wireless’s prepaid service–got a little more interesting this week as Sprint’s Virgin Mobile subsidiary also announced that it would sell Apple’s smartphone at a higher price but lower monthly rates than Cricket. From this tech-support note, it appears that Virgin Mobile will also unlock the iPhone; I’ve asked PR there for clarification but haven’t heard back yet. Update, 6/11/2012: Virgin Mobile publicist Jayne Wallace replied, “Yes the SIM slot is locked, and no it can’t be unlocked.” It will not work on any other carrier, in the U.S. or overseas; that tech-support link came from Virgin Mobile Canada, a separately-owned company.

Update, 6/25/2012: Added a link to video of the TPS panel.