Weekly output: HBO and cord cutting, wireless carriers, two-step verification

This week involved many meetings, but that was okay–I spent a couple of days in New York catching up with my Yahoo Tech colleagues, getting updates about how we’ve done and hearing about future plans. I also successfully installed OS X Yosemite on both of my Macs and cheered on a friend running the Marine Corps Marathon for the first time. Overall: not a bad seven days.

Yahoo Tech post on HBO10/21/2014: Will Sports Learn from HBO’s Grand Online Experiment?, Yahoo Tech

This is a column I’d wanted to write for the past few years, but until recently I didn’t think my chance would come until maybe 2016. The photo illustrating my musings on HBO’s move to sell online-only viewing was an idea that came to me at the last minute, as I was flipping through the paper at the dining table; if only the words could pop into my head so quickly!

10/21/2014: This Is the Best Wireless Carrier for You, Time

The condensed edition of my Wirecutter guide to wireless carriers has run at a few other places (for instance, Fast Company posted its version Sept. 21), but I was tickled more than usual to see it land on the site of the newsmagazine I read almost every week in high school.

10/26/2014: Security update: AOL learns to two-step, and why your ISP may not, USA Today

A friend sent an apologetic e-mail about his AOL account getting hacked (yes, I have some pals who continue to use the site); I was going to tell him to turn on two-step verification and then realized I couldn’t; inquiries with AOL PR led to me breaking the (not-quite-huge) news that it will soon offer two-step verification once again.

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Weekly output: iPhone electrocution, Ethernet chat, VLC and the DMCA, phone upgrades, disabling Android apps

Getting sick when you work for yourself is no fun: There’s nobody else who can fill in to complete the work you signed up to do, so sometimes you can only write slower than usual and take lots of breaks. That’s how I spent part of Tuesday (when my daughter’s cold caught up with me) and all of Thursday (when I was recovering from some weird digestive discomfort by largely taking a break from food).

WTTG iPhone electrocution7/16/2013: iPhone death allegations, Fox 5 News

WTTG had me on the air to talk about a strange story out of China involving a woman electrocuted when she used an iPhone while charging it. I suggested that a poorly-made knock-off charger might have been at fault, and that now seems to be the case.

7/17/2013: Bandwidth Chat, IDG Enterprise

I’ve signed up with IDG to help host a few Twitter chats it’s running for various clients. This week’s Comcast-sponsored chat focused on “carrier Ethernet”–a dry topic that did not seem to draw much interest. But at least it was a good practice for the slightly more consumer-relevant topics coming up.

7/19/2013: Trying To Ban Links to Software Is The DMCA Joke That Never Gets Old, Disruptive Competition Project

I’d meant to write this reaction to HBO asking Google to remove a search result link pointing to the open-source video app VLC sooner–Friday afternoon is not a good time to get a wonky tech-policy post any extra attention. So I submitted a recap of the story on Slashdot (I know, old school), and the editors there were kind enough to put that on the site’s front page.

7/21/2013: Pegoraro: How often should I upgrade my phone?, USA Today

I was amused to see the headline for this analysis of AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon’s new frequent-upgrade deals start with my name–as if I’m some tech sage whose name alone can be invoked to settle arguments.

On Sulia, I offered a preview of what I’d say on Fox 5, observed how a hack into a Congressional site revealed some Hill staffers’ terrible taste in passwords, teed off on the exploitative pricing of the AT&T and Verizon early-upgrade deals, and confessed how my query about an apparent exemption to MLB.tv’s idiotic regional blackouts might have gotten that magic Zip code fixed.

Weekly output: Game of Thrones, security, augmented reality, T-Mobile, phone insurance

Happy Easter!

DisCo Game of Thrones post

3/27/2013: Ethicists Make Lousy Economists, And Other Lessons From the Endless “Game of Thrones” Debate, Disruptive Competition Project

This started life as a draft here a year ago, when I’d gotten fed up by seeing the same old arguments thrown around on Twitter and in blog posts about the HBO series. Then I set it aside, which turned out be a good thing when I had a paying client interested in the topic.

3/29/2013: Social-Media Trend To Watch: Security That Doesn’t Have To Suck, Disruptive Competition Project

With Dropbox, Apple and, soon, Evernote and Twitter following Google’s lead in offering two-step verification as a login option, I’m cautiously optimistic that this competition will yield more usable security than what the efforts of corporate IT have yielded so far. The skeptical comments this post has since gotten have me wondering if I was too optimistic.

3/29/2013: Augmented Reality Doesn’t Need Google Glasses, Discovery News

I revisited a topic I last covered in depth in a 2009 column for the Post. Part of this post recaps how I still use some of the apps I mentioned back then, part suggests some other possible applications, and then I note how Windows Phone 8’s “Lenses” feature could foster “AR” on that platform. I’m not sure all of those parts hold together.

3/31/2013: Q&A: Is T-Mobile’s new math a good deal?, USA Today

The wireless carrier’s no-contract plans may not save you much money if you buy a new smartphone exactly every two years, but if you upgrade less often–or buy an unlocked phone from a third party–they can work well for you. (And if they foster the growth of a carrier-independent market for phones, they would work well for the rest of us.) The post also includes a reminder to watch out for phone-insurance charges on your bill.

Sulia highlights: calculating how much you’d spend on an iPhone 5 and two years of service at the four major wireless carriers; noting the belated arrival of threaded comments on Facebook pages; explaining why Google Maps doesn’t offer real-time arrival estimates for Metro and other transit systems; critiquing the woeful setup experience on a Linksys router.