Weekly output: network security (x2), election security, Google finding Apple’s bugs

Now it can be told: I spent all of the last two weeks on the West Coast, with my stay in Las Vegas for Black Hat and DEF CON sandwiched inside time with my in-laws in California. That let me have a much shorter trip to and from Vegas and then segue from WiFi security to a little wine tasting and, more important, a lot of napping.

8/12/2019: WiFi can be a free-for-all for hackers. Here’s how to stop them from taking your data, USA Today

I e-mailed this to my editor with the following note: “I’m sending this over the DEF CON conference WiFi, so if you only see pirate-flag emoji I trust you’ll call or text to warn me.” If you don’t want to read all 600-ish words in this piece, the top three are “encryption is your friend.”

8/12/2019: This tech could secure voting machines, but not before 2020, Yahoo Finance

One of the big reasons I decided to stick around Vegas for DEF CON–even though it meant I’d have to pay $300 in cash for that conference badge–was the chance to see the exhibits and presentations at its Voting Village. The proceedings did not disappoint, even if a DARPA demo from a project with the delightful acronym of SSITH is far from yielding shipping voting hardware.

8/12/2019: Google got Apple to fix 10 security flaws in the iPhone, Yahoo Finance

Black Hat offered a two-course serving of Apple-security news. Its first day featured a briefing from Google Project Zero researcher Natalie Silvanovich about how her team uncovered 10 serious iOS vulnerabilities, and then its second day brought a talk from Apple security-engineering head Ivan Krstić that ended with news of a much more open bug-bounty program.

8/14/2019: This Morning with Gordon Deal August 13, 2019, This Morning with Gordon Deal

I talked about my USAT column on this business-news radio program; my spot starts just after the 13th minute.

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Weekly output: new Macs, online absentee voting, Tech Night Owl, DuckDuckGo

LISBON–I’m here for my fourth Web Summit, which is also my third in a row to have me moderating panels and away from the U.S. during election day. I like this conference, but I’m missing the experience of casting a ballot in person on the big day. American citizens reading this: You will be doing just that Tuesday if you haven’t already voted early or absentee, right? Because if you don’t, you’re inviting the dumbest person in your precinct to vote in your place.

10/29/2018: Why it’s a big deal that Apple is finally updating its computers, Yahoo Finance

When I wrote this curtain-raiser post for Apple’s news this week, I didn’t factor in Apple charging so much more for memory and storage upgrades. I will try to revisit that topic sometime soon.

11/1/2018: Experts disagree on how to secure absentee votes, The Parallax

This article started as questions I had left over after writing a post about the Voatz blockchain absentee-voting app a few weeks ago.

11/3/2018: November 3, 2018 — Rob Pegoraro and Jeff Gamet, Tech Night Owl

I talked to host Gene Steinberg about some puzzling aspects of Apple’s finally-updated computer lineup, along with its decision to stop revealing unit-sales numbers in future earnings releases.

11/4/2018: What it’s like to use a search engine that’s more private than Google, Yahoo Finance

Not for the first time, a topic I tried out as a post here became a separate story for a paying client. Did that piece get you to set the default search in one of your browsers to the privacy-optimized DuckDuckGo? I’ll take your answer in the comments.

Weekly output: John Brennan on election security, Saudi Arabia’s Twitter operations (x3)

For most of this past week, the conference badge was on the other lanyard: My wife was out of town for work.That brief spell of solo parenting ended with the house miraculously not much messier than before and me needing a nap more than usual.

10/17/2018: Ex-CIA chief’s take on election security: Don’t panic, do stay paranoid, Yahoo Finance

When I filed a first draft of my interview with former CIA director John Brennan two weeks ago, my editor said it read more like two posts and asked if I wouldn’t mind turning it into a pair of stories. This covers the second half of our conversation, folding in some quotes from some subsequent election-security events around D.C.

10/20/2018: Saudi Arabia’s Twitter mole, Al Jazeera

The New York Times reported Saturday that Saudi Arabia’s attempts to suppress dissidents like murdered Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi extended to recruiting a Twitter insider. Several hours later, I told viewers–as overdubbed into Arabic–that this development represented a serious departure from Silicon Valley’s traditional definition of espionage as “an employee takes trade secrets to a competitor.”

10/21/2018: Saudi Twitter operations Al Jazeera

As part of what looks like the same kind of flood-the-zone coverage strategy I usually associate with Apple events, AJ had me on two more times Sunday to talk about this Twitter mole and Riyadh’s other attempts to change the social-media conversation.