Weekly output: credit-card fraud, SaaS developers, Amazon and Crystal City, digital marketing, CTO life, Roborace, For The Web, DMCA exemptions

I fell seriously behind on tweeting out new stories this week, as Web Summit occupied most of my mental processor cycles during my stay in Lisbon. I also didn’t keep up with headlines in my RSS feed or even setting aside a minute or two a day to plod along in Spanish tutorials in the Duolingo app.

The Summit organizers usually post video of every session not long after the conference, but that hasn’t happened yet; when it does, I’ll embed those clips below. They now have.

11/5/2018: Why those chips in your credit cards don’t stop fraud online, Yahoo Finance

The story assignment came from inside the house, in the form of my having to call up a bank to have our cards reissued after somebody spent close to a thousand dollars on that account at Lenovo’s online store.

11/6/2018: Disrupting the traditional SaaS business model: The rise of the developer, Web Summit

My first panel at Web Summit featured two people running software-as-a-service shops: Nicolas Dessaigne of Algolia, and Adam FitzGerald of Amazon Web Services. This topic was well outside of my usual consumer-tech coverage, but a 20-minute panel isn’t too much airtime to fill if you do some basic research.

 

11/6/2018: Why Crystal City would be the right call for Amazon’s HQ2, Yahoo Finance

When I saw the Post’s scoop about Amazon getting exceedingly close to anointing Crystal City, I e-mailed my Yahoo editors volunteering to write any sort of “10 things to know about Arlington” post they might need. They didn’t require that, but they did ask me to write a summary of my county’s advantages–and some of its disadvantages, as noted in a few grafs that reveal the nerdiest bit of verbiage you’ll hear around Arlington.

11/8/2018: Marketing performance in a digital age – complexity to clarity, reaction to action, Web Summit

This was my most difficult panel at this conference, thanks to some reshuffling of questions late in the game and poor acoustics onstage that left me and my conversations partners Vincent Stuhlen (L’Oreal) and Catherine Wong (Domo) struggling to hear each other.

 

11/8/2018: CTO panel discussion: A day in life, Web Summit

Barely 30 minutes later, I had my second panel of Thursday, and this conversation with Cisco’s Susie Wee and Allianz SE’s Markus Löffler went much better.

 

11/8/2018: The human-machine race for the future, Web Summit

What’s not to like about interviewing the head of a robot-racecar company onstage? As a nice little bonus, this chat with Roborace CEO Lucas Di Grassi got introduced by my conference-nerd friend Adam Zuckerman.

 

11/8/2018: The man who created the World Wide Web needs you to help fix it, Yahoo Finance

I wrote up Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee’s Monday-night keynote about his initiative to improve his creation, as informed by a conversation Thursday with the CEO of his World Wide Web Foundation.

11/9/2018: Primer: What new DMCA exemptions mean for hackers, The Parallax

It had been a few years since I’d last unpacked the government’s ability to tell companies and researchers not to worry about the thou-shalt-not-mess-with-DRM provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Spoiler alert: I remain a skeptic of this ill-drafted law.

Updated 11/16/2018 with embedded YouTube clips.

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Weekly output: DMCA exemptions, Facebook futurism, Tinder, Web Summit

Back in March, my friend Ron Miller was recounting his experience at Web Summit a few months earlier and suggesting I go. I’m glad (not for the first time!) I heeded his advice. For a sense of those five days in Dublin, see my Flickr slideshow.

I’m now about to spend a couple of days in New York for the Consumer Electronics Association’s Innovate conference, where I can heckle David Pogue get an update on what the gadget industry’s been up to.

11/3/2015: Why Jailbreaking Your iPhone Is Legal But Hacking eBooks is Not, Yahoo Tech

Longtime readers may recall I wrote a post for CEA’s public-policy blog in 2011 about the incoherent policy of granting exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s ban on circumventing DRM. My wait for an opportunity to revisit this topic ended when the government issued this year’s round of exemptions a week and change ago.

Yahoo Tech Facebook Web Summit talk post11/4/2015: Facebook’s Vision for the Future: Drones With Lasers, All-Seeing AI, VR for Real, Yahoo Tech

This post stands as a sequel of sorts to the piece I filed from SXSW about a similar talk from Google’s “Captain of Moonshots” Astro Teller about a comparable range of ambitious experiments.

11/4/2015: Tinder’s Sean Rad: We’re Changing the World, One Long-Term Relationship at a Time, Yahoo Tech

I was worried I wouldn’t get into the hall to see Rad’s interview, but the crowds parted and I got a seat. As I asked at the end of this post: If you, unlike me, have ever installed Tinder on your own phone, do you agree with Rad’s take on this dating app?

11/6/2015: Robot sex, drone sheep-herding: what you missed at Web Summit, USA Today

The lede and end of this story popped into my head almost immediately, but the rest took longer to write. As in, I was still working on it while on a bus to meet three of my cousins for dinner. (Dublin FYI: The buses have WiFi that worked well for me after I’d answered a moderately intrusive questionnaire on the “captive portal” sign-in page.)

 

Weekly output: phoning it in from cars, begging for DMCA exemptions

I’d mean to have a third post on this list, but my attempt to review Facebook’s new Timeline interface was thwarted by the fact that I still don’t have access to Timeline in my own account. (I’ve asked Facebook PR to look into this.) The switchover of my CEA work from the soon-to-close, subscription-required Tech Enthusiast site to its free Digital Dialogue blog also ate up a decent chunk of time. So there’s just two posts to my name for the week.

12/14/2011, New Rule: No Phone Use Behind The Wheel?, Discovery News

One of the more pleasant surprises of writing for Discovery has been how much I enjoy the challenge of coming up with the featured illustration required by its blogging format. In this case, I first thought I’d take a photo of any old cell phone in front of a car dashboard. Then realized I could have some fun with the concept by instead using the vintage Trimline phone I picked up at a yard sale last year, as you can see in the thumbnail at right.

Oh, right, about the post: This was my first take on the National Transportation Safety Board’s proposed ban on any phone use by drivers. (I plan on revisiting the topic at greater length next week for CEA.) In it, I criticize the proposal for its political implausibility and near-impossible enforcement, then suggest three ways that phone vendors could make in-car use safer. I thought the comments would then light up with denunciations of nanny-state behavior, but about half of them favor the phone prohibition. And then there was one person who decided the real problem on the road is cyclists. I was not amused by that: I’ve clocked about 11,000 miles on my bike since 1998 and I’m a member of the Washington Area Bicyclist Association.

12/16/2011, DMCA Exemptions: Requesting Permission To Innovate, CEA Digital Dialogue

My first non-paywalled post for CEA covered the kind of out-of-the-headlines tech-policy topic that could be a tough sell at a lot of traffic-driven newsrooms: the current round of requested exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s “anti-circumvention” rules. The whole idea that adding “digital rights management” locks to a copyrighted work deprives a buyer of any right to circumvent that DRM to exercise fair-use rights has always struck me as unfair. I used this post to outline the history of requested exemptions from the DMCA’s anti-circumvention rule, something we’re allowed to ask for every three years; collectively, they do not paint a flattering picture of this law.

Note that CEA’s blog (how happy am I see it’s based on WordPress?) includes a separate feed for my contributions, which I encourage you to subscribe to in the RSS client of your choice. If anybody actually does that anymore…