Weekly output: non-spying Samsung TVs, WiFi hotspots, WiFi channels

I miss David Carr too.

I knew that he wrote like an angel and tolerated no bullshit in his New York Times column, that his honest and humane Twitter presence was one of the better reasons to be on that social network, and that it seemed reasonable to be a little star-struck when my friend Deb Amlen introduced me to her NYT desk-mate during a visit to the Times building last summer. It was only after Carr’s way-too-soon death that I learned of all the unrequired and unadvertised kindness he left behind. Damn.

2/10/2015: No, Your TV Doesn’t Care What You Say, Yahoo Tech

Tech-media outlets did not cover themselves in glory when they took one EFF activist’s tweet mocking a poorly-written privacy policy as proof of a technically-implausible voice-recognition scheme on Samsung TVs.

Wirecutter LTE hotspots guide2/11/2015: Best Wi-Fi Hotspot, The Wirecutter

I’ve been working on my second Wirecutter guide for months, but the initial debut of this review of LTE hotspots last Sunday escaped my notice. The update we pushed out on Wednesday gave me an excuse to talk up the story on social media, so I’ll just call that this guide’s publication date for the purposes of this post.

2/15/2015: Bad Wi-Fi performance? Try channel surfing, USA Today

When I got the reader e-mail that led to this column, I thought I’d covered the topic somewhat recently. Nowhere near true: The piece I had in mind ran in 2006, which may explain why researching my correspondent’s query led me to an OS X feature that I had no idea existed.

Weekly output: copyright and APIs, 5 GHz WiFi

Beyond what you see here, I also filed 4,000-plus words’ worth of reviews that have yet to be posted. You can imagine my relief at getting them off the to-do list.

Yahoo Tech API-copyright post5/13/2014: How the Government Can Improve Tech: Stop Reinventing Intellectual Property, Yahoo Tech

In this week’s column, I teed off on the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit’s dangerously foolish ruling that you can copyright the workings of an application programming interface–a judgment that, if the Supreme Court somehow doesn’t toss it in the trash, will make a lot of reverse engineering illegal. I was not surprised in the least to see a few IP maximalists surface in the comments to contest my opinion, but I thought they would try to offer a counterargument more sophisticated than the likes of “this guy wants to make everything free.”

5/18/2014: How to fix pokey WiFi at home, USA Today

In yet another Q&A based on a relative’s computing travails, I explained how switching a WiFi network from 2.4 GHz to 5 GHz could end interference issues caused by a surplus of other WiFi networks and baby monitors but require adding a second router to ensure the same coverage as before.