Is it iPadOS 14 or iPadOS 13.8?

It’s been almost a month since I installed iPadOS 14 on my iPad mini 5, and not much about my tablet-computing experience since has reminded me of that.

Why? Compare Apple’s list of new iPadOS 14 features with its brag list for iOS 14: Apple tablets don’t get home-screen widgets or the App Library, even though their larger displays might better fit those interface changes. Apple’s new Translate app, a privacy-optimizing alternative to Google’s? iPhone only for now. Even emoji search in the keyboard is confined to Apple’s smaller-screen devices.

Like earlier iPad releases, iPadOS 14 omits the basics of weather and calculator apps. I guess Apple still couldn’t find a way “to do something really distinctly great,” as its software senior vice president Craig Federighi told tech journalist Marques Brownlee in the least-persuasive moments of a June interview.

There’s also still no kid’s mode that would let a parent hand over their iPad to a child and have it locked to open only designated apps. The continued absence of this fundamental feature–even the Apple TV supports multiple user accounts!–is especially aggravating after so many American parents have spent the last eight months mostly cooped up at home with their offspring.

Apple did add a bunch of fascinating new features in iPadOS 14 for Apple Pencil users–but my iPad mini 5 and my wife’s iPad mini 4 don’t work with that peripheral.

This new release has brought lesser benefits that I do appreciate. Incoming calls in FaceTime, Google Voice, and other Internet-calling apps now politely announce themselves with a notification at the edge of the screen instead of indulging in the interface misanthropy of a full-screen dialog, and Siri shares this restraint with screen real estate. Safari catches up to Chrome by offering automated translation of their text and surpasses Google’s browser with a privacy-report summary, both available with a tap of the font-size button. I can finally set default mail and browser apps–but not navigation, the area in which Apple remains farthest behind Google. And a set of new privacy defenses include the welcome option of denying an app access to my precise location.

But as nice as those things are, they don’t feel like the stuff of a major annual release–more like the pleasant surprises of an overperforming iPadOS 13.8 update. And they certainly don’t square with what you might reasonably expect from a company that reported $33.4 billion in cash and cash equivalents on hand in its most recent quarter.

What do you think?

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