Steve Wildstrom

About a month after I left the Post, I sent an e-mail with the subject line “Joining the club” to another tech columnist who had been sent packing by his longtime employer a year and a half earlier.

I set aside the fact that I hadn’t had the class to send this guy a sorry-about-the-news note after his departure and instead asked upfront: any lessons from your experience that I should know about?

Barely 12 hours later, 875 words landed in my inbox, full of details about how this writer had handled the departure, his current business models and who he’d been invoicing, and what options I might want to consider. This line about the benefits of working from home stayed with me: “I love the flexibility of being able to cut the lawn on a Tuesday morning if that’s when I feel like doing it.”

The writer was Steve Wildstrom. He wrote Business Week’s personal-tech column from 1994 until 2009 with a combination of experience-driven insight and amused annoyance at the industry’s foibles (see, for example, this review of the Windows 7 upgrade experience), then carved out a successful career on his own after his column didn’t survive Bloomberg’s purchase of the magazine. On Tuesday, cancer took him from us, which gives me another reason to hate it.

I don’t remember when I first met Steve, but whenever it was, I soon got used to getting short e-mails and then tweets from him suggesting other angles to a topic I’d just covered that I might want to pursue. I almost always learned something from him, and I never got any sense that he was trying to show off his knowledge; he just didn’t want a key part of the story to go neglected.

Steve was also one of my favorite people to be on a panel with or run into at a conference (for example, Tech Policy Summit in 2012 and then Privacy Identity Innovation in 2014). I looked forward to seeing him randomly on the other side of the country… and now I can’t.

I am thankful today that I’ve had the chance to learn from people of this caliber. Good work Steve; now you can rest.

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2 thoughts on “Steve Wildstrom

  1. Pingback: Bill Walsh would have made this post better | Rob Pegoraro

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