Weekly output: WWDC, tech policy, Web chat, prepaid iPhones

Happy Father’s Day, everyone. When I became a dad almost two years ago, a friend welcomed me to that new title by calling it “the toughest job you’ll ever love.” I think he was right. And next to that, my last seven days of occupational output seem small in comparison.

6/11/2012: Apple’s WWDC News: iOS Hits The Road, Discovery News

After all of the pre-conference hype about Apple unveiling its own mapping solution for iOS 6, I found the reality presented at its Worldwide Developers Conference Monday morning in San Francisco to be a tad underwhelming and so ranked it fifth on my list of top-five WWDC announcements. Note that I had to update this post a couple of days later to reflect for the fact that this app will, contrary to Apple’s initial silence on the issue, include walking directions. But transit navigation could still be decidedly inelegant.

(Also note that I watched the keynote as almost all of you did: by viewing it online after Apple posted it a few hours later, on account of Apple not issuing me a WWDC press pass. I did, however, get a few peeks at iOS 6 from WWDC attendees Monday night.)

6/15/2012: TPS Report: The Election’s Missing Tech-Policy Issues, CEA Digital Dialogue

After mulling over two days of enlightening banter at the Tech Policy Summit, I wrote up a summary of that conference for CEA that closed by remarking on the allergy some Silicon Valley types have to engaging with Washington in any sustained manner. I may have to explore that at greater length in a future story–along with some other topics discussed at TPS, such as a proposal to hand governance of some core Internet protocols to the U.N.’s International Telecommunications Union and the debate in Europe over mandating a “right to be forgotten” online.

6/15/2012: Mobile Minded (Web chat), CEA Digital Dialogue

The monthly Web chat focused almost entirely on smartphones and tablets, as it should have a week after WWDC and a week and change before Google’s I/O developer conference. The curiosity about iOS 6′s Maps and Passbook apps in particular struck me, so I know to focus on those when I review iOS 6 sometime this fall. I also got at least two questions that should work well for my USA Today Q&A, so that’s good as well.

Now, for a tech-support question of my own: CoverItLive, the DemandMedia site that provides the chat system we’ve used so far, is essentially doing away with its free option at the end of this month. CEA may elect to pay up, but there are alternatives to consider (see, for instance, Digital First Media journalist Mandy Jenkins’ list); if you have any recommendations, I’d like to know about them.

6/17/2012: Cricket or Virgin: What’s best iPhone deal?, USA Today

Not long after Cricket Wireless surprised me by announcing that it would start selling the iPhone, Sprint’s Virgin Mobile USA revealed that it, too, would sell Apple’s iPhone 4 and 4S at a higher cost but lower rates than Cricket. This post compares these two offerings–Virgin comes out ahead in coverage and pricing–and notes one difference left out of most stories on the topic: Cricket’s iPhone will be internationally unlocked for use on GSM services overseas, while Virgin’s can’t be switched to any other carrier. The column closes out with a reminder about taking better photos with a phone.

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Moderating a copyfight at the Tech Policy Summit

NAPA–I spent Wednesday and Thursday in this idyllic locale at the Tech Policy Summit, an annual gathering for tech-industry types to debate many of the issues I cover and care about: intellectual property, Internet governance, online identity, telecom competition and American competitiveness.

My contribution to the proceedings was moderating a discussion on copyright policy Wednesday afternoon between Jonathan Taplin, a professor at the University of Southern California and director of USC’s Annenberg Innovation Lab, and Mike Masnick, founder of Floor64 and editor of Techdirt, a regular read of mine.

I knew that the two would disagree about quite a few things, especially after re-reading this post from Masnick critiquing an earlier talk by Taplin–and that I’ve agreed with a lot of Masnick’s tech-policy work. So I thought I’d try to start on neutral ground, by observing how using technology to automate and accelerate a human activity can upset people who had no earlier objection to it.

I brought up one of my favorite examples of this, noting that after my car stereo was stolen with a CD in it, nobody would have objected if I burned a new disc from a digital copy I’d made myself–but what if that copy was a friend’s? What if it was a stranger’s, found online? (The prop I used at the podium was my copy of The Band’s The Last Waltz; Taplin produced the movie that yielded that soundtrack.) Then I observed that Masnick wasn’t a fan of using software to automatically ticket red-light violators, asked my first question–and things got a little contentious.

When the organizers post the video of the conversation, you’ll want to watch it. In the meantime, you can get a sense of the proceedings from the tweets by audience members, archived after the jump.

Update, 6/25/2012: The video of our panel is now up at the TPS site. Enjoy!

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