Weekly output: Cable WiFi, travel WiFi, Internet governance, phone lanes, Find My iPhone vs. Android

In one way or another, wireless technology figured in all of my stories this week. But why should this week be any different from others?

7/15/2014: With Cable WiFi, Your Modem Is My Hotspot, Yahoo Tech

I’ve been working on this column for a while–my e-mail correspondence for it goes back weeks–and for once, the news cycle obliged by not throwing any breaking tech news at me on a Monday. I’m still trying to figure out how so many people say they hate the idea of Comcast turning their leased modem into a public hot spot but so few (according to Comcast) opt out of it.

7/15/2014: How to Stop (or Start) Sharing Your Internet Connection with Strangers, Yahoo Tech

To go with the column, I wrote a quick explainer about how to turn off Comcast’s Home Hotspot–or set up an openwireless.org guest account for anybody to use.

NowU domestic-bandwidth story7/15/2014: What You Need to Know About Staying Connected in the U.S., NowU

This Gannett site for empty nesters officially launched on Tuesday, but if you’d thought to visit that site on Sunday you could have read my advice on traveling bandwidth then.

7/16/2014: Issues Raised by New Technology: Policy Slam, Internet Governance Forum USA 2014

This part of this daylong conference at George Washington University was an audience-participation event: People were invited to step up to the podium and share their ideas about Internet-governance issues that we ought to focus on, and then I and the other judges picked ones to debate further and offered our own comments about them.

7/17/2014: Cellphone Talkers Get Their Own Sidewalk Lane in D.C., Yahoo Tech

A bit of an experiment staged for an upcoming National Geographic TV show led to this extra post (so, my thanks to NatGeo for the upcoming extra income). The piece got a blurb on the Yahoo home page, so this may have been seen by more people than anything else I’ve written. And then it got a BeyondDC/Greater Greater Washington writeup, which was also nice.

7/20/2014: Get a browser to work where it’s not welcome, USA Today

This column pretty much wrote itself once I realized Apple’s short-sighted and easily-circumvented decision to block Android browsers from its Find My iPhone page matched the New York Post’s foolish attempt to keep iPad users from reading its Web site.

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Weekly output: iPad mini, iPad mini vs. Nexus 7 vs. Kindle Fire HD, Galaxy Note II, lost phones, deactivated phones

It’s been an interesting week for reader comments.

11/5/2012: The iPad Mini: Apple’s Big Little Tablet, Discovery News

As I wrote here yesterday, I’m liking Apple’s smaller tablet more than I thought I would, and didn’t mind saying so in this review. I don’t know why it didn’t incite the usual comments flame war (“Apple’s awesome!” “No, Apple sucks!”), much less what to make of the gibberish replies a couple of readers left. Was that a case of pocket-commenting, or were they confused about how to spam the comments?

11/7/2012: Tablet showdown: iPad mini vs. Nexus 7 vs Kindle Fire HD, CNNMoney

I’ve been trying out Amazon’s Kindle Fire HD for several weeks, but I didn’t get around to writing about it until I did this comparison of it, the iPad mini and Google’s Nexus 7. I’m less impressed with the Seattle retail giant’s tablet efforts the second time around, while the Nexus 7 still holds up pretty well against the iPad mini.

I thought I might get some grief from readers for kicking the Kindle Fire HD to the curb like that, but instead I got several comments from irritated fans of… the BlackBerry PlayBook.

11/10/2012: Galaxy Note II Is More Than A Handful, Discovery News

Speaking of irritated fans, this dismissive review of Samsung’s latest oversized phone enraged a few Galaxy Note II partisans, who took to the comments to argue (paraphrasing loosely) that only limp-wristed losers would find this phone too big. One reader even wrote at length on on Google+ that most people don’t even use phones one-handed; I give him credit for saying so in a literate and civil manner, but I still have to regard that as the most delusional analysis I’ve seen since Karl Rove’s election-night math.

11/11/2012: How to find a lost or stolen smartphone, USA Today

I’ve been meaning to write this overview of find-my-phone apps for months, but the wireless carriers’ launch last week of a stolen-phone database finally got me to finish the job. The post also reminds readers that they can turn a deactivated smartphone into a poor man’s iPod touch that can also dial 911 in a pinch, a point I made in a CEA post last fall.