Weekly output: encryption explained, OS X autocorrect, DoubleClick dialog

Yes, I did get your CES PR pitch.

Yahoo Tech crypto FAQ12/7/2015: FAQ: How Encryption Works And Why People Are So Freaked Out About It, Yahoo Tech

The 1.0 version of this column was a detailed look at how encryption works in Pretty Good Privacy and in iOS 8; not for the first time, an editor said I’d gotten too far into the weeds and asked for a rewrite. After this 2.0 version ran, I was pleasantly surprised to have several readers send me PGP-encrypted messages.

If you’d like to know more about this issue, including some of the history behind this debate, see Andrea Peterson’s longer FAQ in the Washington Post.

12/11/2015: Tip: Best Way to Fix OS X’s Autocorrect? Turn It Off, Yahoo Tech

With my USA Today column no longer including a weekly tip at the end, Yahoo was happy to run this tip… which was really more of a rant.

12/13/2015: DoubleClick message should have prompted double take, USA Today

A brief snafu at Google’s advertising subsidiary may not have been sufficient material for a column, but I’d like to think that using it to remind people to be wary of strange requests from even familiar Web sites was a worthwhile exercise.

Weekly output: virtual and augmented reality, moving from a Mac to an iPad

I finally got around to using Twitter’s Periscope app to stream live video tonight, thanks to a low-power FM station going on the air a short walk from my house. Some 15 years after I first wrote about “LPFM,” it’s pretty exciting to be able to put one of these hyperlocal stations in my presets; look for an article about this soon.

Pegoraro Yahoo Tech UMD VR AR demo12/4/2015; Virtual Surgery, 3-D Security Cameras, and Other Glimpses of Our Augmented Future, Yahoo Tech

I took a field trip to College Park to check out a presentation about the work the University of Maryland and some affiliated researchers are doing with virtual and augmented reality, and I thought it interesting enough to write up this report. A bonus of this drive: getting to hear UMD’s freeform station WMUC.

On my way back, I stopped by Al Jazeera’s D.C. studio to answer a few questions about Mark Zuckerberg’s philanthropy, but I have no idea if any of that aired as planned on AJ’s Arabic-language channel.

12/6/2015: How to ease move from a Mac to iPad, USA Today

Once again, Thanksgiving-weekend tech support yielded a Q&A column for USAT. Do you have any tips about a Mac-to-iPad migration to add to this story’s advice?

Weekly output: encryption politics, Thanksgiving tech support

I did better than I expected at avoiding work e-mail over this weekend, but I did have to set aside time to revise two Wirecutter pieces. On Monday, the latest iteration of our guide to the major wireless carriers went up, covering price shifts at Sprint and T-Mobile and improved international-roaming options at Sprint and Verizon Wireless. Then on Wednesday, we corrected last week’s guide to prepaid and resold wireless service to explain how our pick, Consumer Cellular, had begun wholesaling T-Mobile’s service as well as AT&T’s. I missed that non-trivial change, and I’m still annoyed about the oversight.

11/24/2015: The Paris Attacks Were Tragic, but Cryptography Isn’t to Blame, Yahoo Tech

I returned to the debate over whether tech companies should be required to build in back doors for law enforcement–my last such post ran in September–to argue that the argument for compromised crypto is even weaker when you look at adversaries like the Paris murderers. Who, by the way, hardly bothered to cover their tracks.

USAT Thanksgiving 2015 tech-support column11/27/2015: How to improve family’s Wi-Fi and other tech support tips, USA Today

My original concept of this column was to write a sort of greatest-hits compilation of earlier pieces, but I soon realized that this story could and should note the ways these consumer-tech problems had gotten better or worse since I’d last covered them for USAT. I’m not sure what made this piece so widely shared on Facebook–though having my column run two days early must have helped–but I’m flattered anyway.

Writing this also reminded me that I was sorely overdue to uninstall Oracle’s Java software off one laptop. I had disconnected that program from my browser long ago, but it still didn’t justify its storage footprint.

Weekly output: cross-device tracking, prepaid and MVNO wireless, Justin Bieber Mode, USB-C cables and chargers

My business travel for the year officially wrapped up with my return Friday night from a brief but meeting-packed trip to NYC. If I spend any other nights out of town for work before CES 2016, somebody else will need to be paying.

In other news: Welcome, new readers interested in Syrian-refugee politics and/or USB-C accessories! Should you keep reading, each Sunday you will find a recap of where I wrote or spoke or was quoted; at least one more day in the week sees me writing about some other thing that doesn’t fit at my usual outlets.

11/17/2015: Cross-Device Tracking: How the Ad Industry Will Follow You Wherever You Go, Yahoo Tech

A workshop hosted by the Federal Trade Commission Monday gave me an opportunity to write about a topic I’ve been following for a while.

Wirecutter prepaid MVNO wireless guide11/19/2015: Best Prepaid and Alternative Cellphone Plans, The Wirecutter

My third guide at this site covers both prepaid and resold (aka “MVNO,” short for “mobile virtual network operator”) wireless service, and it was many months in the making. Please read the comments; I spent part of Friday morning answering the first round of reader feedback, and I’ll be back there Monday or Tuesday.

11/19/2015: Who Should Be On Lyft’s Playlist After Justin Bieber?, Yahoo Tech

Yes, I’m old to cover anything involving Justin Bieber. But after getting a prompt in the Lyft app to partake in this promotion, I couldn’t not write about the weird intersection of the ride-hailing service and the Canadian pop star.

11/22/2015: Some Android users face quandry with USB-C, USA Today

My self-serving motivation to write this column was my own curiosity over when the phone chargers handed out as tech-event swag will feature USB Type-C connectors to match the hardware on my new phone. Before you mention it: Yes, I’m aware of the typo in the headline, and we’ll get that fixed soonest.

Weekly output: data caps, enterprises and startups, semi-anonymous social media, T-Mobile price plans, social media and Paris attacks

I had a fun few days in New York at the Consumer Electronics Association’s Consumer Technology Association’s Innovate conference. I’d also planned to spend some of my time in Manhattan at Fast Company’s Innovation Festival, but learning only hours before that a talk by Apple retail chief Angela Ahrendts had been made off-limits to the press (aside from Fast Company’s Harry McCracken, who himself didn’t know about this rule and his exclusion from it) annoyed me enough to skip the rest of that conference. Here’s a little event-planning FYI: don’t indulge in that sort of control-freakery. You will only annoy the press, and word will get out on social media anyway.

11/11/2015: Cap as Cap Can: Comcast, T-Mobile Redefine Data Limits in Ways You May Not Like, Yahoo Tech

One point I could have made in this post but did not: Comcast’s devotion to fairness apparently stops with business customers, who face no such data tiers.

11/12/2015: Witness the Symbiosis Between Enterprises and Startups, Tech.Co

Tech.Co’s Will Schmidt wrote up the panel I moderated at the Celebrate conference last month. The post also includes full video of our discussion.

CAM Summit panel11/13/2015: How Social is Going Private: Snapchat, Texting and New Platforms, Campaigns & Marketing Summit

I had the easiest job as moderator ever because my panelists–Sherri Anne GreenJenn KauffmanKat Murti, and Emily Rasowsky--knew their stuff, enjoyed debating it and didn’t step over each other’s lines. I hope the organizers post video of our talk at some point.

11/13/2015: T-Mobile’s new deal will mean rate hikes for some users, USA Today

The feedback loop on this one got a little crazy when T-Mobile CEO John Legere tweeted his annoyance at the headline’s suggestion that some T-Mo subscribers would pay more. That’s a fair complaint, since the carrier didn’t touch plans in effect before Sunday–as the story itself makes clear. My editor said we’d take another look at the headline, but as of Sunday night it had not been changed.

11/14/2015: Social media and the Paris attacks, WTOP

The news station had me on to talk about how social media carried news of Friday’s atrocities in Paris and then gave people ways to, as I put it, scream, cry or wonder why. A busy schedule that Saturday meant I had to do the interview sitting in our parked car while our daughter’s soccer team was playing on the adjacent field, which is not an ideal situation in multiple ways.

Weekly output: DMCA exemptions, Facebook futurism, Tinder, Web Summit

Back in March, my friend Ron Miller was recounting his experience at Web Summit a few months earlier and suggesting I go. I’m glad (not for the first time!) I heeded his advice. For a sense of those five days in Dublin, see my Flickr slideshow.

I’m now about to spend a couple of days in New York for the Consumer Electronics Association’s Innovate conference, where I can heckle David Pogue get an update on what the gadget industry’s been up to.

11/3/2015: Why Jailbreaking Your iPhone Is Legal But Hacking eBooks is Not, Yahoo Tech

Longtime readers may recall I wrote a post for CEA’s public-policy blog in 2011 about the incoherent policy of granting exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s ban on circumventing DRM. My wait for an opportunity to revisit this topic ended when the government issued this year’s round of exemptions a week and change ago.

Yahoo Tech Facebook Web Summit talk post11/4/2015: Facebook’s Vision for the Future: Drones With Lasers, All-Seeing AI, VR for Real, Yahoo Tech

This post stands as a sequel of sorts to the piece I filed from SXSW about a similar talk from Google’s “Captain of Moonshots” Astro Teller about a comparable range of ambitious experiments.

11/4/2015: Tinder’s Sean Rad: We’re Changing the World, One Long-Term Relationship at a Time, Yahoo Tech

I was worried I wouldn’t get into the hall to see Rad’s interview, but the crowds parted and I got a seat. As I asked at the end of this post: If you, unlike me, have ever installed Tinder on your own phone, do you agree with Rad’s take on this dating app?

11/6/2015: Robot sex, drone sheep-herding: what you missed at Web Summit, USA Today

The lede and end of this story popped into my head almost immediately, but the rest took longer to write. As in, I was still working on it while on a bus to meet three of my cousins for dinner. (Dublin FYI: The buses have WiFi that worked well for me after I’d answered a moderately intrusive questionnaire on the “captive portal” sign-in page.)

 

Weekly output: CISA, e-mail “sub-addressing”

Greetings, frustrated owners of Timex sport watches. I’m glad that essay I wrote in a fit of nerd rage continues to draw such interest at each time change, and I hope that at least some of the people who come here looking for help taking their timepiece in and out of Daylight Saving Time stick around and keep reading.

I spent much of this week wrapping up work on a long and long-delayed story. This coming week will see me in Dublin, where I’m covering Web Summit and catching up with some cousins I haven’t seen in over a dozen years. That’ll be my last air travel for work this year, and I am quite okay with that fact.

Yahoo Tech CISA post10/27/2015: CISA: Why Tech Leaders Hate the Latest Cyber-Security Bill, Yahoo Tech

I had meant to write about this cybersecurity bill earlier, but instead this post went up on the day that the Senate approved it by a 74-21 vote. I guess the folks there did not find this piece terribly persuasive. FYI: If you don’t like rants about Obama’s creeping dictatorship, you might want to avoid the comments.

11/1/2015: When a site rejects email “sub-addressing”, USA Today

Want to protect your privacy by giving a site a custom e-mail address that still lands in your inbox? Some won’t let you do that, and their explanations don’t square with the basic specifications of e-mail.